Jammin

Make sure to hit play on the above mood music before you start in on this post.

In anticipation of 23 chickens going into the freezer in a little over a month, I started to clean out the freezer this past weekend. Old and freezer burned berries went to the birds. Good berries that we haven’t polished off, jammin! We had some rhubarb to harvest and use, so pretty much all the jam was fruit plus rhubarb.

Salmobarb Jam –> salmonberry (picked in Cordova, Alaska) and rhubarb; turned out too runny in my opinion but Shane says it is his favorite. I think it will be good more as a syrup over pancakes.

Peabarb Jam –> peaches (leftover from last summer’s Oregon trip) and rhubarb jam. One of my favorites! I made a ton last summer and ate it all, so glad to have more in the pantry! This goes great with plain yogurt.

Blubarb Jam –> wild Alaskan blueberries (smaller and tarter than what most Americans know as a blueberry) and rhubarb jam. Another of Shane’s favorite since he loves tart foods, this may have ended up a bit thick but still delicious.

Cranberry Butter –> Alaskan highbush cranberries with homemade applesauce. First time making this and it is a keeper! I used my juicer to get the seeds out and simmered it down with baking applesauce (a batch of the applesauce I made last year that doesn’t taste stellar, so we simply use it for baking). It turned out this deep red color. We were putting it on dark chocolate as it simmered down.

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I don’t know if we save much money canning. Everyone says they do, but I’ve never tracked it. Shane said we at least eat better since we tend not to buy the high priced yet delectable jars of jam at our Farmer’s Market. Plus, I’ve never seen pickled watermelon rind for sale. I’m making this for my dad for Christmas. I guess his grandma use to make these when he was a kid.

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And in the words of the late Bob Marley:

“Ooh yeah, we’re jammin’, hey
To think that jammin’ was a thing of the past
We’re jammin’, we’re jammin’
And I hope this jam is gonna last”

 

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8 thoughts on “Jammin

    1. Not sure how they are related to raspberries but look similar. Perhaps closer to blackberries in size and shape. As for taste, in between that of a raspberry and blackberry. They come in red to yellow. They are also called cloudberry.

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  1. Ha yeah good point about knowing if canning jam really saves any money as I never really bought jam until I started making it because I never like store bought jam! Btw I want to try some of that salmonberry jam!! We have three bushes in the shade of our yard that we planted a few years ago from the native plant sale here, but never end up fruiting after they flower (bastards) πŸ™‚

    By the way did you chop and freeze your peaches last year or did you can them? Last year we skipped peaches as it was too damn hot but this year I’m committed to getting at least 50 lb from Sauvie Island as I like using it in salsa not to mention canning halved peaches, mmm!

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    1. Same here – we simpy didn’t eat it before we made it. That is a huge bummer about your Salmonberries not producing berries. Hmm. They were gangbuster when we down in Cordova last year. I’ll see what I can do on the jam front though I’m worried it didn’t set up – too runny. It may be more like pancake syrup. πŸ™‚

      The peaches were frozen. We chopped and froze them last summer before we came up to Alaska – too hard to transport ripe peaches to AK otherwise. I missed a bag apparently and found it as I was cleaning out the freezer. I was stoked! We also did peach salsa which goes great on duck tacos!

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